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The origins of Jurassic Park's Velociraptors
#1
http://news.yale.edu/2015/06/18/yale-s-l...ssic-world

Quote:Despite the name change, Ostrom wrote that Crichton had confirmed to him that the fictional Velociraptor was modeled after Deinonychus in “almost every detail.”

He was convinced that “the Terror of Jurassic Park really is Deinonychus parading around under an assumed name.”

Informative read on the origin of Jurassic Park's most fearsome inhabitants.
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#2
That's pretty cool! Crichton went so deep with his research.
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#3
Another good read on the velociraptor/deinonychus naming debacle by Smithsonian's Brian Switek (who also wrote for the Jurassic World website):

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...-33789870/


Quote:This new view of dinosaurs, in part, inspired the 1988 book Predatory Dinosaurs of the World by paleo-artist Gregory S. Paul. Not only was the volume chock-full of illustrations of feathered dinosaurs, but it also attempted to revise some dinosaur taxonomy. Paul noted the similarities between the skeletons of the Velociraptor from Mongolia and the Deinonychus skeletons from North America. They were so similar, in fact, that he decided to group the Deinonychus fossils under the name Velociraptor, as the older name took precedence according to the rules by which organisms are named. 

Paleontologists did not agree with this change— Velociraptor was kept distinct from Deinonychus—but Paul’s book was a hit with the general public. And one of the people who read the book was author Michael Crichton. We know this because in the acknowledgements for his novel Jurassic Park, Crichton listed Paul as one of the people who inspired his vision for dinosaurs portrayed in the book, and he used the name Velociraptor to describe the large, sickle-clawed predators that disembowel so many humans in the fictional yarn. The same taxonomy was carried over into the film series, which ultimately made what would otherwise seem to be an abstruse scientific term a household name.


If only Crichton hadn't read Gregory Paul's theory that deinonychus fossils should be grouped under the velociraptor name, the raptors might have been called deinonychus in the book and movie.  Velociraptor is a much sexier name though (and gives us the slangy nickname "raptor"), so things worked out for the better I think.
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#4
Until Jurassic Park came along I'd never heard of Velociraptor - but I knew Deinonychus and it was one of my favorites! Both names have a nice ring to it, but I must agree Velociraptor "Raptor" is a lot catchier (and easier to pronounce too).
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#5
(08-29-2016, 11:38 AM)Neelis Wrote: Until Jurassic Park came along I'd never heard of Velociraptor - but I knew Deinonychus and it was one of my favorites! Both names have a nice ring to it, but I must agree Velociraptor "Raptor" is a lot catchier (and easier to pronounce too).

Same here actually. And probably only because of the Dinamation Deinonychus.
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#6
(09-03-2016, 08:18 AM)Victoria Wrote:
(08-29-2016, 11:38 AM)Neelis Wrote: Until Jurassic Park came along I'd never heard of Velociraptor - but I knew Deinonychus and it was one of my favorites! Both names have a nice ring to it, but I must agree Velociraptor "Raptor" is a lot catchier (and easier to pronounce too).

Same here actually. And probably only because of the Dinamation Deinonychus.

I think I knew Deinonychus before I saw the exhibition, but Dinamation's Deinonychus truly shaped my idea of what they possibly looked like.

It truly was an awesome sculpt, the predatory dinosaur feeding on a dead Tenontosaurus, its giant claws and long snout with rows of razor-sharp teeth... well, I was eight or nine years old, their robots were giants in my eyes and impressed me tremendously.
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#7
What I don't really get is that in the novel Wu said that they classified the park's Velociraptors as mongoliensis according to the finding location of the amber. And Grant answered that he recently digged up an antirrhopus.
So the raptors of the park should actually be the real Velociraptor mongoliensis whereas Grant's excavation is the real Deinonychus antirrhopus.
But still the park's raptors have the appearance of Deinonychus.
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