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Dilophosaurus' size
#21
(01-27-2017, 03:19 AM)Collector1100 Wrote: Well, there was a 1993 article by Empire that labeled the Dilo a "baby". 

http://www.empireonline.com/movies/featu...ssic-park/

So it might be that the Dilo seen in JP1 is a juvenile.

That's a fascinating read, looking back on the film! Thank you for the link.

Quote:Today's work is with the almost hyper-realistic models, with their intricately cabled eyes, mouths, and limbs. As soon as Spielberg gets his raptor hop, he has to turn to a thorny shot of a baby 'spitter', or Dilophosaurus.

"He's the only creature that hasn't worked too well," muses Spielberg. "We had tremendous success with the T-rex, triceratops, the 'raptors, but when we came to the little spitter which I always anticipated would be the easiest dinosaur of all..." Spielberg shrugs. He knows he'll get a second crack in the editing room.

That's a little odd; in the making of book they are adamant the dinosaur's size was changed on purpose (to not confuse it with the Velociraptors), but here a journalist with (what we assume) no special knowledge of dinosaurs describes it as "a baby". He must have been told by a crew member. 

It makes me wonder if there was unclarity over the dinosaur's size, or possibly a change in narrative and the information from the making of book was never caught out. 

It's still up for debate then, it seems. 
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#22
(01-27-2017, 08:14 AM)Neelis Wrote: That's a little odd; in the making of book they are adamant the dinosaur's size was changed on purpose (to not confuse it with the Velociraptors), but here a journalist with (what we assume) no special knowledge of dinosaurs describes it as "a baby". He must have been told by a crew member. 

It makes me wonder if there was unclarity over the dinosaur's size, or possibly a change in narrative and the information from the making of book was never caught out. 

It's still up for debate then, it seems. 
I believe the claim made in The Making of Jurassic Park is still true. The Empire article was written two months after the film was first released, so the claim that it was a "baby" might have been created in response to the scientific criticism that the Dilo received.  Something like this similarly happened with the raptors. The raptors were purposely made larger than they actually were in life, but when Utahraptor was discovered I recall that they used its discovery as a justification for the oversized film raptors.

Furthermore, I can't find any evidence that Jody Ducan and Don Shay were wrong about the reason for the Dilo's small stature. The closest to a claim outside of the works of Duncan and Shay is paleoartist Mark Hallett who makes a rather vague claim in his article of his work on JP1 in Prehistoric Times #105:
Quote:From the beginning of production, the identity of the Spitter, the totally fictional, small fringed-and-venom-spitting theropod that later killed the character Dennis Nedry, hadn't been dealt with. Like most other film characters, however, it rapidly "evolved" through a series of stages. Speilberg generally liked the wedgy head morphology of the real, Late Triassic [sic] theropod Dilophosaurus wetherilli, but its 23 foot length had to be "dwarfed down" to fit the Spitter's dimensions, as well as equipping it with an Australian Fringe Lizard's [sic] frill and, of course, the ability to spit venom.
Hallett describes the JP Dilo as a totally separate creature rather just a juvenile. Plus, Hallett recommends reading Cinefex #55's article about JP which was written by Jody Duncan, the same author of the Making of... book, and the Cinefex article gives the same reason as the book as to why the Dilo was sized down, albeit Cinefex states that it was Speilberg himself who decided to make it smaller.
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#23
Thank you, very insightful! It's a miniature version of the real creature then, would that best describe it? I do wonder, should we ever see Dilophosaurus make an appearance again, if the film makers will keep it small, like in the first film, or will opt for the real-life animal's size.
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